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Archibald Gracie Camp #985
New York, N.Y.
SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS
Our History

Just as it still does today, New York City has long attracted visitors from around the Country, and around the World. As a New York Times article from 1891 stated, the city’s “Southern Colony… [came] here after the war with no other capital than pluck, brains, and devoted wives…” and maintained a “clannishness.. [as] the result of a cherished past enshrined in tender memories of heroic sacrifice and sufferings bravely borne.”

The connections between Dixie and the Big Apple were many. For one, the United States Military Academy at West Point, at which so many Southern Officers studied, is but a few miles to the north. Secondly, the South’s cotton crop had been a staple of the City’s financial markets. A heavily-Democrat city in a Republican state, Mayor Fernando Wood had even proposed New York City’s secession in the lead up to the War! Not to join the Confederacy, but simply to become a neutral party. This spirit of peace and reconciliation continued into the days of Reconstruction, when men such as Confederate General Joseph Wheeler took up residence.

The Gracie Camp’s earliest reference comes in a New York Times article from May of 1893 (three years prior to the founding of the national organization), discussing in-fighting in what was clearly already a well-established club.

In the ensuing years, Southern Society flourished in the City, with even the First Lady of the Confederacy, Varina Davis, taking up residence following President Davis’ death in 1889, and becoming a locally beloved journalist. Their names soon became among the most notable: the Baruchs and the Lehmans to name a few. A wonderful aside: Simon Baruch, the family patriarch and a Confederate Veteran, would often embarrass his family at the Metropolitan Opera by standing and giving the rebel yell anytime Dixie was played. His wife famously would attempt to tug him back down into his seat by his tuxedo tails.

Eventually, six Southern generals would have their remains put to rest in Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, more generals than are buried in all of Louisiana! Countless other Confederate veterans in graves across the City, and we also have hundreds of Confederate POWs buried in Cypress Hills Cemetery taken from field hospitals following the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg.

So while New York City may seem an odd place for a Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp, it is a place that needs and deserves one!



Archibald Gracie Camp #985
New York, N.Y.
SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS
PGMcCullough@scv.nyc
1-800-MY-DIXIE (1-800-693-4943)